State Specific Information on Child Abuse

Fifty (50) States and the District of Columbia have enacted laws which address mandatory reporting of child abuse to protect the health and safety of children. Little League Baseball, Incorporated (LLB) has compiled a summary of all currently existing state laws regarding mandatory reporting of child abuse.

It is strongly recommended that local leagues consult with legal counsel in its jurisdiction to determine the applicability, if any, of state and local requirements, if any, to its program regarding the reporting of child abuse.

The information that follows is current through June 15, 2017

Reporting Child Abuse

  • National Level

    There are resources on reporting child abuse available at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service’s website:

    http://www.childwelfare.gov/responding/reporting.cfm

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Service’s website also contains a list of child abuse reporting telephone numbers for each state and includes links to each state’s child welfare agency website.

    https://www.childwelfare.gov/organizations/CWIGFunctionsaction=rols:main.dspROL&rolType=custom&rs_id=5

    This link provides access to the U.S. Department of Health web pages on mandatory reporting across all 50 states:

    https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/systemwide/laws-policies/state/

    Below is a link from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on how to report suspected child abuse:

    https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/responding/reporting/how/

    There is a national child abuse reporting hotline, which is staffed 24 hours a day, 7 days a week with crisis counselors and a nationwide database of emergency, social service and support resources to help and guide any person deciding whether or not to make a report of child abuse:

    Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline

    1-800-4-A-CHILD

    1-800-422-4453

  • Alabama

    Alabama requires certain listed professionals (including doctors, any other medical professional, physical therapists, teachers, administrators and employees of public or private K-12 institutions, police officers, day care employees, mental health professionals or clergy to report orally, by phone or in person, any known or suspected child abuse to the proper authorities and to follow up the oral report with a written report to the authorities.

    In addition, the statutes permit any other person, firm, corporation or official who knows of or suspects child abuse to make the same report to the proper authorities.

    The Department of Human Resources shall make efforts to determine the military status of the parent or guardian of the child who is the subject of child abuse or neglect allegations and shall notify a United States Department of Defense Family Advocacy Program that there is an allegation of child abuse being investigated.

    Abuse is defined by the statute as any harm or threatened harm to a child’s health, welfare, or well-being, including physical abuse, neglect, sexual abuse, mental abuse or attempted sexual abuse or exploitation.

    The proper authorities to contact with any known or suspected child abuse are the Department of Human Resources, the chief of police for the city, town, or county, the sheriff or any person, group or organization designated by the Department of Human Resources to receive child abuse reports.

    Links to the specific sections of the official Alabama Code are not available. The mandatory reporting statutes are found in Title 26 (INFANTS AND INCOMPETENTS), Chapter 14 (REPORTING OF CHILD ABUSE OR NEGLECT), Sections 26-14-1 through 26-14-13. To access the entire Alabama Code, follow:

    http://alisondb.legislature.state.al.us/alison/codeofalabama/1975/coatoc.htm

    Links to the specific sections summarized above, including definitions, in an unofficial [1] version of the Code online are available as follows:

    http://law.justia.com/codes/alabama/2012/title-26/chapter-14/

    http://law.justia.com/codes/alabama/2012/title-26/chapter-14/section-26-14-3/

    http://law.justia.com/codes/alabama/2012/title-26/chapter-14/section-26-14-4/

    http://law.justia.com/codes/alabama/2012/title-26/chapter-14/section-26-14-5/

    http://law.justia.com/codes/alabama/2012/title-26/chapter-14/section-26-14-1/

    http://law.justia.com/codes/alabama/2012/title-26/chapter-14/section-26-14-6.1/

    This link provides access to contact information for the Department of Human Resources by County:

    http://dhr.alabama.gov/counties/county_select.aspx

    This is a link to the child abuse reporting information provided by the Department of Human Resources website:

    http://dhr.alabama.gov/services/Child_Protective_Services/Abuse_Neglect_Reporting.aspx

    and to the Frequently Asked Questions on child abuse reporting on the department website:

    http://dhr.alabama.gov/services/Child_Protective_Services/FAQs_CA.aspx


    [1] Please note any unofficial sources may not reflect the most current changes in Alabama law and should not be relied upon.

  • Alaska

    Alaska requires certain listed individuals (including health care providers, teachers and administrators, police officers, institutional administrative officers, day care or child care providers, paid employees of domestic violence intervention or prevention programs, paid employees of drug and/or alcohol treatment or rehabilitation programs, members of special teams that review deaths of children, and athletic coaches) who in the course of performing their jobs know or have reasonable cause to suspect a child is being abused or neglected to report the abuse to the Department of Health and Social Services. The law also provides that any other person who knows or has reasonable cause to suspect child abuse or neglect may report the harm to the child to the Department of Health and Social Services. All abuse or suspected abuse should be reported immediately. Volunteers who interact with children in a public or private school for more than four hours a week and suspect that a child has suffered harm as a result of child abuse or neglect shall immediately report the harm to the nearest office of the Department. There is no requirement for an athletic coach who is an unpaid volunteer to report child abuse.

    If there is an emergency situation and the Department of Health and Social Services cannot be reached, the statute allows a person to make the report to a law enforcement officer who is then required to take action and notify the Department of Health and Social Services as soon as possible.

    The statute defines child abuse as physical injury, neglect, mental injury, sexual abuse, sexual exploitation or other maltreatment of a child that harms the health or welfare of the child.

    To access the entire child abuse reporting chapter of the official Alaska Code online, follow:

    http://touchngo.com/lglcntr/akstats/Statutes/Title47/Chapter17.htm

    To access the specific sections summarized above in the official Alaska Code online, follow:

    http://touchngo.com/lglcntr/akstats/Statutes/Title47/Chapter17/Section020.htm

    http://touchngo.com/lglcntr/akstats/Statutes/Title47/Chapter17/Section290.htm

    This link provides access to contact information for the Department of Health and Social Services by region:

    http://dhss.alaska.gov/Commissioner/Pages/Contacts/default.aspx

    The Department of Health and Social Services also provides this phone number to make reports if the appropriate office cannot be reached: 1-800-478-4444

    This is a link to the child abuse reporting information provided by the Department of Health and Social Services web site:

    http://dhss.alaska.gov/ocs/Pages/default.aspx

  • Arizona

    Arizona requires that a certain list of persons (including health care professionals, mental health paraprofessionals, public or private school counselors, school officials including officials of institutions of higher education, peace officers, parents/guardians/step-parents of a child, teachers or administrators, domestic violence advocates and any other person who has responsibility for the care or treatment of a child) who reasonably believes that a child has been the victim of child abuse or neglect to immediately report known or suspected child abuse to a peace officer or the Department of Child Safety or to a Tribal Law Enforcement or Social Services Agency for any Indian minor who resides on an Indian Reservation. If the abuse is being performed by someone other than a custodian of this child, then the abuse is to be reported only to a law enforcement officer.

    Reports are to be made immediately, by telephone or in person, and are to be followed within seventy-two (72) hours by a written report.

    Any other person not mentioned in this statute who reasonably believes that a child is being abused or neglected may report that information to a peace officer or to the Department of Child Safety, unless the abuse is not at the hands of the custodian of the child, in which case the report should be made only to a peace officer.

    The statute defines “abuse” as intentional physical injury, neglect, mental injury, inflicting or allowing sexual abuse or other sexual contact as prohibited by state law and unreasonable confinement of the child. To access the specific sections summarized above in the official Arizona Code online, follow:

    http://law.justia.com/codes/arizona/2005/title13/03620.html

    Follow this link to reach the Department of Child Safety home page and other resources on child abuse reporting:

    https://dcs.az.gov

    Follow this link to reach the Department of Child Safety Services information on reporting abuse or neglect:

    https://dcs.az.gov/services/suspect-abuse-report-it-now

    Arizona Child Abuse Hotline:
    Toll free at 1-888-SOS-CHILD
    1-888-767-2445

  • Arkansas

    Under Arkansas law, certain individuals (including child care workers, coroners, dentists and dental hygienists, domestic abuse advocates or domestic violence shelter employees or volunteers, employees or volunteers at a reproductive health center, employees of the Department of Human Services, foster parents, judges, law enforcement officials, medical professionals and health care personnel, school officials including in institutions of higher education and teachers, school counselors, social workers, court appointed advocates or probation/intake officers, clergy, attorneys, and others) are mandated by law to immediately notify the Child Abuse Hotline, operated by the Department of Human Services, if he or she reasonably suspects a child has been subject to maltreatment, observes a child being subject to conditions or circumstances that will result in maltreatment or suspects that a child died as a result of maltreatment.

    Any other person shall immediately notify the Child Abuse Hotline if they have reasonable cause to suspect child maltreatment, child death as a result of maltreatment or observes the child being subject to conditions which may result in maltreatment of the child.

    The act defines child “maltreatment” to include abuse, sexual abuse, neglect, sexual exploitation or abandonment.

    Links to the specific sections of the official Arkansas Code are not available. The mandatory reporting statutes are found in Title 12 (Law Enforcement, Emergency Management, and Military Affairs), Subtitle 2 (Law Enforcement Agencies and Programs), and Chapter 18 (Child Maltreatment Act), Subchapters 12-18-101 through 12-18-1108. To access the entire Arkansas Code, follow:

    http://www.lexisnexis.com/hottopics/arcode/Default.asp

    Links to the specific sections summarized above, including definitions, in an unofficial<href=”#_ftn1″ name=”_ftnref1″> [1] version of the Code online, are available as follows:</href=”#_ftn1″>

    http://law.justia.com/codes/arkansas/2012/title-12/subtitle-2/chapter-18/subchapter-4/section-12-18-401/

    http://law.justia.com/codes/arkansas/2012/title-12/subtitle-2/chapter-18/subchapter-4/section-12-18-402/

    http://law.justia.com/codes/arkansas/2012/title-12/subtitle-2/chapter-18/subchapter-1/section-12-18-103/

    http://law.justia.com/codes/arkansas/2012/title-12/subtitle-2/chapter-18/

    The Arkansas Department of Human Services Website provides an overview of the Arkansas Law, frequently asked questions and warning signs of abuse, definitions, links to the Arkansas Code, and information for mandatory reporters at the links below:

    http://www.humanservices.arkansas.gov/dcfs/pages/childprotectiveservices.aspx

    Arkansas Child Abuse Hotline:
    1-800-482-5964

    Please note any unofficial sources may not reflect the most current changes in Arkansas law and should not be relied upon.

  • California

    Under California law, certain individuals (including teachers and school officials, day care or child care employees, employees of day camps or youth organizations or recreation programs or centers, directors, coaches, assistant coaches or athletic personnel at public or private sports organizations, public assistance workers, district attorneys, case workers, doctors or medical professionals or health care workers, counselors and therapists (including candidates), coroners, commercial film developers, animal control officers, clergy, law enforcement officers or employees of a police department, alcohol and drug counselors, among others) are required to report suspected child abuse to any police department, sheriff’s department, county probation department, or the county welfare department, but not including school district police or security. These agencies will also accept reports from persons not named above as mandatory reporters. An internal policy shall not direct an employee to allow his or her supervisor to file or process a mandated report under any circumstance. School districts that do not train their employees in the duties of mandated reporters under the child abuse reporting laws will have to report to the State Department of Education the reasons why this training is not provided.

    On or after 1/1/2018, a Child Care Licensee applicant shall take training in the duties of mandated reporters as a condition of licensure. A Child Care Administrator or employee of a licensed Child Day Care Facility shall take Mandated Reporters training within the first 90 days when employed by the Facility. A Licensee, Administrator or employee of a Licensed Child Day Care Facility shall take renewal Mandated Reporter training every two years. The absence of training shall not excuse a Mandated Reporter from the duties imposed.

    A County Probation or Welfare Department shall immediately report a child victim of commercial sexual exploitation. If a child victim of commercial sexual exploitation is missing, the County Probation or Welfare Department shall immediately report the incident to the appropriate Law Enforcement Authority for entry into the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s National Crime Information database for Missing and Exploited Children.

    The statutes define child abuse or neglect as physical injury or death inflicted upon a child through non-accidental means, the willful harming or endangering of a child, or unlawful corporal punishment.

    The statutes also define neglect, sexual abuse, and willful endangerment of a child.

    Links to the specific sections of the official California Penal Code are not available. The mandatory reporting statute is found in Part 4 (PREVENTION OF CRIMES AND APPREHENSION OF CRIMINALS), Title 1 (INVESTIGATION AND CONTROL OF CRIMES AND CRIMINALS), Chapter 2 (Control of Crimes and Criminals), Article 2.5 (Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting Act), Sections 11164 through 11174.3. To access the entire California Penal Code, follow:

    http://codes.findlaw.com/ca/penal-code

    Links to the specific sections summarized above, including definitions, in an unofficial<href=”#_edn1″ name=”_ednref1″> [i] version of the Code online, are available as follows:</href=”#_edn1″>

    http://codes.lp.findlaw.com/cacode/PEN/3/4/1/2/2.5/s11165.9

    http://codes.lp.findlaw.com/cacode/HSC/1/d10/4/1/s11165.1

    http://codes.lp.findlaw.com/cacode/PEN/3/4/1/2/2.5/s11165.6

    http://codes.lp.findlaw.com/cacode/PEN/3/4/1/2/2.5/s11165.2

    http://codes.lp.findlaw.com/cacode/PEN/3/4/1/2/2.5/s11165.3

    http://codes.lp.findlaw.com/cacode/PEN/3/4/1/2/2.5/s11165.7

    Below is a link to a list of California county welfare offices and their contact information:

    http://www.calfresh.ca.gov/PG839.htm

    Below is a link to and a web address for a PDF of the child abuse reporting hotlines for all counties:

    Child Protective Services (CPS) Hotlines:

    http://www.cdss.ca.gov/Reporting/Report-Abuse/Child-Protective-Services

    Below is a link provided by the Department of Social Services regarding reporting child abuse:

    http://www.cdss.ca.gov/Reporting/Report-Abuse/Child-Protective-Services

  • Colorado

    Under Colorado law, certain listed individuals (including doctors or other medical professionals, coroners, dentists, teachers and school administrators, social workers, counselors or other mental health professionals or candidates, veterinarians, law enforcement officers, firefighters, victims’ advocates, clergy, employees of the department of human services, child and family investigators, probation officers, animal protection officer, and other named individuals) are required to report any known or reasonably suspected abuse or neglect or conditions that might lead to abuse or neglect of a child to the county Department of Social Services or a local law enforcement agency.

    Any other person, in addition to those specifically named in the statute, shall report any known or suspected abuse, neglect, or conditions that could lead to abuse or neglect, of a child to a local law enforcement agency or the county Department of Social Services immediately.

    The Colorado Abuse Reporting Act is found in Title 19 (CHILDREN’S CODE), Article 3 (Dependency and Neglect), Section 19-3-304. There is no direct link to the specific section of the Colorado Code. To access the entire Child Abuse Reporting Act in the official Colorado Code online, follow:

    http://www.lexisnexis.com/hottopics/colorado/

    Below is the link to the Colorado State Department of Social Services web site on reporting child abuse and the contact information for each county’s department of human services office:

    http://co4kids.org

    If you want to report suspected abuse or neglect you should contact the county in which the activity is taking place. If you do not know what county, you may call the state Department of Human Services at 1-844-CO-4-Kids .

  • Connecticut

    Under Connecticut law, certain listed professionals (including doctors or other health care professionals and employees, mental health professionals or counselors, school employees, social workers, probation officers, law enforcement officers, clergy, domestic violence or sexual assault counselors, day care or child care employees, foster parents, employees of the state Department of Public Health and the Department of Children and Families, any employee of the Office of Early Childhood who is responsible for the licensing of child day care centers, group day care homes, family day care homes or youth camps, child advocates, any coach who is 18 years old or older, of intramural or interscholastic athletics, any coach or director of youth athletics who is 18 years old or older, any coach or director of a private youth sports organization, league or team who is 18 years old or older and any paid administrator, faculty, staff, athletic director, athletic coach or athletic trainer employed by a public or private institution of higher education who is 18 years old or older, excluding student employees, and other named professionals) are required to report orally (by phone or in person) any known or suspected child abuse they encounter in the ordinary course of their employment or profession to the Commissioner of Children and Families or to a local law enforcement agency not later than twelve hours after they have cause to know of or suspect child abuse. Then, these professionals are also required to file a written report of the known or suspected abuse to the Commissioner of Children and Families within 48 hours after making the oral report.

    To access the entire Connecticut Chapter on Child Welfare, including any relevant definitions, follow:

    https://www.cga.ct.gov/current/pub/chap_319a.htm

    To access the entire Connecticut Code online, follow the link below. The reporting act is contained in Title 17a (Social and Human Services and Resources), Chapter 319a (Child Welfare), Sections 17a-101 through 110:

    http://www.cga.ct.gov/current/pub/titles.htm

    The Connecticut Department of Children and Families website provides valuable information including:

    Definitions of abuse and neglect:

    www.ct.gov/dcf/cwp/view.asp?a=2639&Q=393928

    Information for mandatory reporters:

    http://www.ct.gov/dcf/cwp/view.asp?a=3483&Q=413540

    Answers to frequently asked questions about reporting child abuse, including a link to the required written report form for mandatory reporters:

    http://www.ct.gov/dcf/cwp/view.asp?a=2556&q=314388

    The Connecticut Child Abuse and Neglect Hotline operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Connecticut strongly encourages anyone who suspects that a child has been abused or neglected or is in danger of abuse or neglect to call the Hotline at:

    1-800-842-2288 or TDD: 1-800-624-5518

  • Delaware

    Under Delaware law, any person (including certain listed professionals), organization or other entity that knows of or has good faith suspicion of the abuse or neglect of a child is required to report that known or suspected abuse or neglect immediately to the Department of Services for Children, Youth and Their Families (by telephone or in person). A written report may be requested at a later time by the Department of Services for Children, Youth and Their Families. Any person may also give an oral or written report to any police officer, but must still make the report to the Department of Services for Children, Youth and Their Families.

    Abuse is defined by the statute as any physical injury, emotional abuse, sexual abuse, torture, exploitation, maltreatment or mistreatment.

    Links to the specific sections of the official Delaware Code online are not available. The mandatory reporting statute is found in Title 16 (Health and Safety), Part II (Regulatory Provisions Concerning Public Health), Chapter 9 (ABUSE OF CHILDREN), Sections 901 through 914. To access the entire Delaware Chapter on Child Abuse, follow:

    http://delcode.delaware.gov/title16/c009/sc01/index.shtml

    Links to the specific sections summarized above, including definitions, in an unofficial<href=”#_ftn1″ name=”_ftnref1″> [1] version of the Code online, are available as follows:</href=”#_ftn1″>

    http://codes.lp.findlaw.com/decode/16/9/I/903

    http://codes.lp.findlaw.com/decode/16/9/I/904

    http://codes.lp.findlaw.com/decode/16/9/I/902

    The Delaware Department of Services for Children, Youth and their Families website contains valuable links, information, and the answers to frequently asked questions about reporting child abuse in Delaware:

    http://kids.delaware.gov/fs/fs_iseethesigns.shtml

    The Delaware Department of Services for Children, Youth and their Families website also contains the form to be used by professionals who are required by law to report child abuse or neglect, in a written report. * Please note, professionals are still required to complete a call to the Report Line when using this form.

    http://kids.delaware.gov/pdfsFillSave/fs_CAN_MandatoryForm_v2_FS.pdf

    In Delaware, ALL REPORTS of child abuse and neglect should be made to the toll free number below 24 hours a day, seven days a week at:

    Child Abuse and Neglect Report Line:
    1-800-292-9582

    Please note any unofficial sources may not reflect the most current changes in Delaware law and should not be relied upon.

  • District of Columbia

    The District of Columbia requires certain individuals and professionals (including employees of the department of child and family services, doctors and other medical or health care professionals and employees, law enforcement officers, animal cruelty officers, school teachers and officials, public housing officers, employees of the department of parks and recreation, social workers, day care or child care workers, domestic violence counselors and mental health care professionals) that have reasonable cause to suspect child abuse or reasonable cause to suspect a child is in immediate danger of abuse and discovers this information in his or her professional capacity, are required by law to immediately report the knowledge or suspected abuse to either the Metropolitan Police Department of the District of Columbia or the Child and Family Services Agency. Professionals in hospitals, schools, or agencies are required to also report the abuse to the person in charge of the institution.

    Under the statute, any other person not specifically listed shall also report child abuse or suspected child abuse to either the Metropolitan Police Department of the District of Columbia or the Child and Family Services Agency.

    The statute applies to physical abuse, mental abuse, sexual abuse or neglect of a child.

    To access the specific sections summarized above in the unofficial District of Columbia Code online, including any relevant definitions, follow:

    http://dccouncil.us/files/user_uploads/event_testimony/dc_code_unofficial_sept_2013.txt

    The web page for the Metropolitan Police Department:

    http://mpdc.dc.gov/

    Contact information for the Metropolitan Police Department can be found at:

    http://mpdc.dc.gov/

    The website for the District of Columbia or the Child and Family Services Agency, which provides general information and links to resources on spotting child abuse, is:

    http://cfsa.dc.gov/

    The D.C. CFSA takes reports of child abuse and neglect 24 hours a day, seven days a week at:

    1-202-671-SAFE
    1-202-671-7233

  • Federal

    Under Federal law, certain professionals (including doctors and health care professionals, mental health care professionals, social workers, foster parents, commercial film processors, child care providers, teachers and school officials and law enforcement officers) performing their jobs on Federal land or in a Federally operated facility are required to report known or suspected child abuse as soon as possible, on a standard written reporting form, to the agency designated by the Attorney General, which is currently the Federal Bureau Investigation (FBI), except in cases of sexual abuse or serious injury or life threatening neglect, in which case the report is to be made to local law enforcement.

    Abuse is defined to include physical or mental injury, sexual abuse or exploitation.

    To access this section of the US Code in an unofficial format online, follow:

    http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/42/13031.html

  • Florida

    Under Florida law, any person who knows of or has reasonable cause to suspect that a child is being abused, neglected or abandoned is required to report such abuse to the Department of Children and Family Services immediately by calling the department’s abuse hotline, using the web-based report feature or sending a fax. Only certain types of professionals are required to give their names during the reporting process (including doctors, mental health professionals, school teachers or administrators, social workers and law enforcement officers).

    If the abuse is at the hands of someone other than the parent, legal guardian, custodian, or family member of the child, a report is to be made to the county sheriff’s office or other law enforcement agency.

    Reports involving juvenile sexual abuse or a child who has exhibited inappropriate sexual behavior shall be made and received by the Department. Any alleged incident of juvenile sexual abuse involving a child who is in the custody of or protective supervision of the Department shall

    be reported to the Department’s central abuse hotline.

    Abuse is defined as physical, mental or sexual abuse, injury or harm that causes or is likely to cause the child’s physical, mental or emotional health to be significantly impaired. Abuse includes acts or omissions.

    To access the specific sections summarized above in the official Florida Code online, including any relevant definitions, follow:

    http://www.leg.state.fl.us/statutes/index.cfm?App_mode=Display_Statute&Search_String=&URL=0000-0099/0039/Sections/0039.201.html

    http://www.leg.state.fl.us/statutes/index.cfm?App_mode=Display_Statute&Search_String=&URL=0000-0099/0039/Sections/0039.01.html

    For valuable information about reporting abuse online, the abuse hotline, definitions of abuse, how to report abuse, information for mandatory reporters, links to the statutes, and other resources and information on child abuse, follow any of the following links to the Florida Department of Children and Family Services web site:

    http://www.myflfamilies.com/service-programs/abuse-hotline

    https://reportabuse.dcf.state.fl.us/

    http://www.myflfamilies.com/service-programs/abuse-hotline/howtoreport

    http://www.myflfamilies.com/service-programs/abuse-hotline/frequently-asked-questions

    http://www.myflfamilies.com/service-programs/abuse-hotline/resouces

    http://www.myflfamilies.com/service-programs/abuse-hotline/training

    Florida Abuse Hotline
    1-800-962-2873

  • Georgia

    Under Georgia law, certain individuals and professionals (including doctors, physician assistants and other health care professionals and employees, mental health professionals, school teachers and administrators, counselors, child welfare employees, clergy and law enforcement personnel) who know of or have reasonable cause to believe a child is being abused are required to report such abuse or suspected abuse by telephone immediately, but in no case later than 24 hours, and followed by written report if required, to the Department of Human Services Division of Family and Children Services or where no such department exists, to an appropriate police authority or district attorney. When a person identified above has reasonable cause to believe that child abuse has occurred involving a person who attends to a child pursuant to such person’s duties as an employee or volunteer at a hospital, school, social agency, or similar facility, the person who received such information shall notify the person in charge of such hospital, school, etc. and the person so notified shall report or cause a report to be made in accordance with the Code section. Any other person or professional not specifically listed may report any known abuse or reasonably suspected abuse to the Department of Human Services or where no such department exists, to an appropriate police authority or district attorney.

    Abuse is defined as physical injury or death caused by neglect, exploitation, sexual abuse or sexual exploitation of the child. Sexual abuse includes consensual sex acts between minors if any individual is less than 14 years of age. It does not include consensual sex acts when the sex acts are between a minor and an adult who is not more than four years older than the minor.

    Links to the specific sections of the official Georgia Code online are not available. The mandatory reporting statute is found in Title 19 (Domestic Relations), Chapter 7 (Parent and Child Relationship Generally), Article 1 (General Provisions), Section 19-7-5. To access the entire Georgia Code on Child Abuse, follow:

    http://www.lexisnexis.com/hottopics/gacode/Default.asp

    Links to the specific sections summarized above, including definitions, in an unofficial<href=”#_ftn1″ name=”_ftnref1″> [1] version of the Code online, are available as follows:</href=”#_ftn1″>

    http://law.justia.com/codes/georgia/2010/title-19/chapter-7/article-1/19-7-5/

    The Georgia Department of Human Services Division of Family and Children Services website has information on reporting child abuse in Georgia:

    http://dfcs.dhs.georgia.gov/portal/site/DHS-DFCS/menuitem.5d32235bb09bde9a50c8798dd03036a0/?vgnextoid=213a2b48d9a4ff00VgnVCM100000bf01010aRCRD

    County listing of contact information for local Department of Human Services Division of Family & Children Services:

    http://dfcs.dhs.georgia.gov/complete-list-all-county-offices

    Georgia Abuse Hotline: 1-855-422-4453

    Please note any unofficial sources may not reflect the most current changes in Georgia law and should not be relied upon.

  • Hawaii

    Under Hawaii law, any person (including doctors or other health care professionals and employees, employees or officers of public or private schools, employees of public or private agencies providing social, medical or financial assistance, employees of any law enforcement agency, day care or child care providers and employees of any public or private agency providing recreational sports or activities) in their professional capacity who knows of or has reasonable cause to suspect child abuse or neglect or suspects such abuse or neglect is about to occur is required to immediately report such information orally to the Department of Human Services Social Services Division or to the police.

    Abuse is defined as acts or omissions which have resulted in the physical or psychological health or welfare of the child, including physical abuse, mental abuse, sexual abuse or neglect.

    At this time, public links to Hawaii’s official code are not available. Links to the specific sections summarized above, including definitions, in an unofficial<href=”#_ftn1″ name=”_ftnref1″> [1] version of the Code online, are available as follows:</href=”#_ftn1″>

    http://codes.lp.findlaw.com/histatutes/1/20/350/350-1

    http://codes.lp.findlaw.com/histatutes/1/20/350/350-1.1

    Below is a link to the Hawaii Department of Human Services Social Services Division website, which is responsible for protecting children and adults from abuse:

    http://humanservices.hawaii.gov/ssd/home/child-welfare-services/

    The link above also provides a Handbook manual from the department of social services on reporting child abuse:

    Child Abuse Reporting Hotline:

    808-832-5300 or 1-800-494-3991

    Please note any unofficial sources may not reflect the most current changes in Hawaii law and should not be relied upon.

  • Idaho

    Under Idaho law, certain individuals and professionals (including doctors and other health care professionals and employees, social workers, teachers, coroners, and day care personnel) or any other person with knowledge of abuse or reason to believe a child is being abused or neglected, are required to report such information within 24 hours to the Department of Health and Welfare or a law enforcement agency (city police, prosecuting attorney, state law enforcement or the sheriff of any county).

    Abuse is defined to include any act or omission resulting in physical injury or death that is not accidental and sexual abuse or conduct with the child.

    To access the specific sections summarized above in the official Idaho Code online, including any relevant definitions, follow:

    https://legislature.idaho.gov/statutesrules/idstat/Title16/T16CH16/SECT16-1605/

    https://legislature.idaho.gov/statutesrules/idstat/Title16/T16CH16/SECT16-1602/

    For more information, visit the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare website at:

    http://healthandwelfare.idaho.gov/Children/AbuseNeglect/tabid/74/Default.aspx

    Use the following link to find contact information for your local department of health and welfare child protection office:

    http://healthandwelfare.idaho.gov/Children/AbuseNeglect/ChildProtectionContactPhoneNumbers/tabid/475/Default.aspx

    If you suspect a child is being abused or neglected, you should call your local child protection office at the above link, or you should call the Idaho Careline:

    Idaho Careline:
    Statewide: 1-855-552-KIDS (5437)

  • Illinois

    Under Illinois law, certain individuals (including doctors and other health care professionals and employees, substance abuse treatment personnel, school personnel and administrators, social workers, domestic violence program personnel, counselors and other mental health professionals, law enforcement officers, day care or child care employees, probation officers and animal control officers, among many others) are required to report, immediately, any reasonable suspicion of child abuse known to them in their professional capacities by telephone or in person to the Department of Children and Family Services. Any other person in their individual or professional capacity may make a report of any known or suspected child abuse to the Department of Children and Family Services.

    Abuse is defined by the statute as inflicting physical injury or death upon a child, creating a substantial risk of physical injury or death for a child, or allowing or committing any sex offense against a child, torturing a child or exploiting a child.

    Links to the specific sections of the official Illinois Code online are not available. The link to the entire mandatory reporting act in the official Illinois Code online is:

    http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs3.asp?ActID=1460&ChapterID=32

    Links to the specific sections summarized above, including definitions, in an unofficial [1] version of the Code online, are available as follows:

    http://codes.lp.findlaw.com/ilstatutes/325/5/4

    http://codes.lp.findlaw.com/ilstatutes/325/5/3

    http://codes.lp.findlaw.com/ilstatutes/325/5/7

    For important information on child abuse, neglect and the Illinois reporting laws, see the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services at:

    http://www.state.il.us/dcfs/PreventingChildAbuseandChildNeglect/act.shtml

    Illinois Child Abuse Hotline:
    1-800-25-ABUSE
    (1-800-252-2873)

    Please note any unofficial sources may not reflect the most current changes in Illinois law and should not be relied upon.

  • Indiana

    Under Indiana law, any individual who has reason to believe that a child has been the victim of child abuse or neglect is required to make an oral report within 48 hours of such abuse to the Department of Child Services or to a local law enforcement agency.

    Abuse is defined by the statute as inflicting physical injury or death upon a child, creating a substantial risk of physical injury or death for a child or allowing or committing any sex offense against a child, torturing a child or exploiting a child.

    Links to the specific sections of the official Indiana Code online are not available. The link to the entire mandatory reporting act in the official Indiana Code online is:

    http://www.in.gov/legislative/ic/code/title31/ar33/ch5.html

    Links to the specific sections summarized above, including definitions, in an unofficial [1] version of the Code online, are available as follows:

    http://codes.lp.findlaw.com/incode/31/33/5/31-33-5-1

    http://codes.lp.findlaw.com/incode/31/33/5/31-33-5-2

    http://codes.lp.findlaw.com/incode/31/33/5/31-33-5-4

    For more information on the Indiana reporting statute and the Indiana Child Abuse Hotline, please refer to the Indiana Child Services website:

    http://www.in.gov/dcs/2971.htm

    Indiana Child Abuse and Neglect Hotline:
    1-800-800-5556

    Please note any unofficial sources may not reflect the most current changes in Indiana law and should not be relied upon.

  • Iowa

    Under Iowa law, certain individuals in their professional capacities (including social workers, employees of health care facilities, mental health professionals, school employees, employees of substance abuse programs, foster care facility employees, police officers and others) are required to report any known or suspected child abuse within twenty-four (24) hours to the Department of Human Services by telephone or in person. A written report is required within forty-eight (48) hours. Any other person not specifically listed by this statute may make a report to the Department of Human Services regarding known or suspected child abuse.

    The statute defines child abuse as any non-accidental physical injury, any mental injury, the commission of a sexual offense with or to a child, and the failure to provide food, clothing, shelter or medical treatment to a child.

    Links to the specific sections of the official Iowa Code online are not available. The mandatory child abuse reporting act is located in Title VI (Human Services), Subtitle 5 (Juveniles), Chapter 232 (Juvenile Justice), Sections 232.67 through 232.77. The link to the entire official Iowa Code online is:

    http://search.legis.state.ia.us/nxt/gateway.dll/ic?f=templates&fn=default.htm

    Links to the specific sections summarized above, including definitions, in an unofficial [1] version of the Code online, are available as follows:

    https://www.legis.iowa.gov/DOCS/IACODE/2001/232/68.html

    https://www.legis.iowa.gov/DOCS/IACODE/2001/232/69.html

    https://www.legis.iowa.gov/DOCS/IACODE/2001/232/70.html

    For important information about the Iowa child abuse reporting laws and how to make a report, see the Iowa Department of Human Services website:

    http://dhs.iowa.gov/child-abuse

    Child Abuse Hotline:
    1-800-362-2178

    Please note any unofficial sources may not reflect the most current changes in Iowa law and should not be relied upon.

  • Kansas

    Under Kansas law, certain listed individuals (including doctors and other licensed health care professionals, licensed mental health care professionals, teachers and school administrators and employees, firefighters and other emergency services employees, any employee of an organization providing social services, and others) are required to report, promptly, any known or suspected child abuse or neglect to the Kansas Department for Children and Families or to a law enforcement agency by telephone or in person and must be followed by a written report containing certain information. Any other person not specifically mentioned may make a report of any known or suspected child abuse.

    Child abuse is defined to include physical, mental or sexual abuse or neglect.

    To access the specific sections summarized above in the official Kansas Code online, including any relevant definitions, follow:

    http://kslegislature.org/li/statute/038_000_0000_chapter/038_022_0000_article/038_022_0023_section/038_022_0023_k/

    http://kslegislature.org/li/statute/038_000_0000_chapter/038_022_0000_article/038_022_0002_section/038_022_0002_k/

    http://kslegislature.org/li/b2015_16/statute/038_000_0000_chapter/038_022_0000_article/038_022_0002_section/038_022_0002_k/

    To access valuable information on the Kansas Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services, including a PDF booklet on reporting guidelines and information for parents, visit the departments website at:

    http://www.srs.ks.gov/agency/cfs/Pages/AbuseNeglectRegistry.aspx

    http://www.dcf.ks.gov/Pages/Report-Abuse-or-Neglect.aspx

    To report child or adult abuse or neglect in Kansas call:
    1-800-922-5330

  • Kentucky

    Under Kentucky law, any person who knows of or has reasonable cause to suspect child abuse is required to immediately report such abuse by telephone, in person or in writing, to a law enforcement agency or to a commonwealth or county attorney or other designated representatives. Certain professionals have the additional duty to file a written report within forty-eight (48) hours.

    Child abuse is defined to include non-accidental physical injury, emotional injury, failure to provide the child essential care and protection, sexual abuse or exploitation of the child, abandonment, exploitation and neglect.

    Links to the specific sections of the official Kentucky Code online are not available. The mandatory child abuse reporting act is located in Title LI (Unified Juvenile Code), Chapter 620 (Dependency, Neglect and Abuse), Sections 620.010 through 620.030. The link to the entire official Kentucky Code online is:

    http://www.lrc.ky.gov/KRS/620-00/CHAPTER.HTM

    Links to the specific sections summarized above, including definitions, in an unofficial [1] version of the Code online, are available as follows:

    http://law.justia.com/codes/kentucky/2012/chapter-620/620.030/
    http://law.justia.com/codes/kentucky/2012/chapter-620/620.020/

    For more information, including links to county specific contact information and frequently asked questions about reporting abuse see the Kentucky Department for Community Based Services website:

    http://chfs.ky.gov/dcbs/dpp/childsafety.htm

    http://chfs.ky.gov/dcbs/dpp/faqchildabuse.htm

    Child Protection Hot Line:
    1-877-KYSAFE1
    or
    1-877-597-2331 (Toll Free)

    Please note any unofficial sources may not reflect the most current changes in Kentucky law and should not be relied upon.

  • Louisiana

    Under Louisiana law, certain individuals are required by law to report any known or suspected child abuse by utilizing the child abuse prevention hotline. Required reporters include any individual who provides health care or mental health services, any clergy, any teacher or other school employee, school coaches (including but not limited to public technical or vocational school, community college, college, or university coaches and coaches of intramural or interscholastic athletics), child care providers, law enforcement officers, commercial film developers, court appointed child advocates, youth organizations and youth activity providers. The type of abuse reported determines which agency is the proper authority to which report should be made. Persons not specifically listed by statute may report any known or suspected child abuse. Those persons required to report must also provide a written report of the abuse within five days. Each mandatory reporter shall obtain mandatory training.

    Child abuse is defined as any act which endangers the physical, mental, emotional or health and safety of a child, including exploitation and sexual abuse or activity.

    To access the specific sections summarized above in the official Louisiana Code online, including any relevant definitions, follow:

    https://legis.la.gov/legis/Law.aspx?d=73201

    https://legis.la.gov/legis/Law.aspx?d=73202

    To access more information on reporting child abuse in Louisiana, including forms for mandatory reporters and other valuable information on spotting child abuse, see the Louisiana Department of Children and Family Services website at:

    http://dss.louisiana.gov/index.cfm?md=pagebuilder&tmp=home&pid=109

    To Report Child Abuse in Louisiana 24 Hours a day, 365 Days a Year, Call:
    1-855-4LA-KIDS
    1-855-452-5437

  • Maine

    Under Maine law, certain individuals (including doctors and other health care professionals and employees, teachers and school officials, youth camp counselors or administrators, social workers, court appointed advocates, mental health professionals, commercial film developers, law enforcement officers, code enforcement officials, clergy, sexual or domestic assault counselors, and school bus drivers, among others) are required to immediately report known or suspected child abuse to the Department of Child and Family Services by telephone or to the district attorney if the person causing the abuse is not the child’s parent or legal guardian. A person is required to make a report if that person knows or has reasonable cause to suspect that a child is not living with the child’s family. A report must be made immediately if there is reason to suspect that a child has been living with someone other than the child’s family for more than 6 months or if there is reason to suspect that a child has been living with someone other than the child’s family for more than 12 months pursuant to a power of attorney. If a person required to report notifies either the person in charge of an institution, agency or facility, or a designated agent, the notifying person shall acknowledge in writing that the institution, agency or facility has provided confirmation to the notifying person that another individual from the institution, etc. has made a report to the department. An employer may not take any action to prevent or discourage an employee from making a report. Any person not specifically listed by statute may report known or suspected abuse to the department of child and family services or the local district attorney.

    Child abuse is defined to include physical, mental, emotional or sexual abuse, exploitation or neglect of the child’s essential needs.

    To access the specific sections summarized above in the official Maine Code online, including any relevant definitions, follow:

    http://www.mainelegislature.org/legis/statutes/22/title22sec4002.html

    http://www.mainelegislature.org/legis/statutes/22/title22sec4011-A.html

    http://www.mainelegislature.org/legis/statutes/22/title22sec4011-B.html

    http://www.mainelegislature.org/legis/statutes/22/title22ch1071sec0.html

    For valuable information on reporting abuse in Maine, including links for mandatory reporters, links to Maine’s statutes, and training information, as well as tips on how to spot abuse, go to Maine’s Department of Child and Family Services website at:

    http://www.maine.gov/dhhs/ocfs/cw/reporting_abuse.shtml

    http://www.maine.gov/dhhs/ocfs/cps/

    http://www.maine.gov/dhhs/mandated_reporters.shtml

    http://www.maine.gov/dhhs/ocfs/abuse.htm

    To report Child Abuse in Maine 24 hours a day, call:
    1-800-452-1999

  • Maryland

    Under Maryland law, certain individuals (including health care practitioners, police officers, educators, and human service workers) that know of or have reason to believe, in their professional capacities, that a child is being abused or neglected, are required to immediately report the abuse to a local law enforcement agency. This report is to be made to the local Department of Social Services or local police agency by telephone or in person, and followed up by a written report within forty-eight (48) hours. An individual not listed in the statute may report known or suspected sexual abuse orally or in writing to the local Department of Social Services or local law enforcement agency. Any other person not listed in this statute that knows of or has cause to believe child abuse is occurring is required to report the abuse to the local Department of Social Services or local law enforcement agency.

    Child abuse is defined to include physical, mental or sexual abuse of a child.

    Links to the specific sections of the official Maryland Code online are not available. The mandatory child abuse reporting act is located in Family Law, Title 5 (Children), Subtitle 7 (Child Abuse and Neglect), Sections 5-701 through 50715. The link to the entire official Maryland Code online is:

    http://www.lexisnexis.com/hottopics/mdcode/

    Links to the specific sections summarized above, including definitions, in an unofficial [1] version of the Code online, are available as follows:

    http://law.justia.com/codes/maryland/2013/article-gfl/section-5-701/

    http://law.justia.com/codes/maryland/2013/article-gfl/section-5-704/

    http://law.justia.com/codes/maryland/2013/article-gfl/section-5-705/

    To access more specific information on reporting child abuse in Maryland and tools for spotting child abuse, see the Maryland Department of Social Services website:

    http://dhr.maryland.gov/child-protective-services/

    To report child abuse toll free in Maryland, call:
    1-800-332-6347

    Please note any unofficial sources may not reflect the most current changes in Maryland law and should not be relied upon.

  • Massachusetts

    Under Massachusetts law, certain individuals in their professional capacities (including doctors and other health care professionals and employees, drug and alcohol counselors, mental health professionals, teachers and school administrators, child care or day care employees, probation officers, social workers, clergy, foster parents, firefighters and law enforcement officers) are required to report known or suspected child abuse by telephone or in person to the Department of Children and Families within forty-eight (48) hours, and are thereafter required to file a written report with the Department of Children and Families. A mandated reporter may additionally file a report with local law enforcement or a child advocate about the abuse. Hospitals are required to inform local district attorneys, law enforcement agencies and the department with physical evidence of abuse. Any other person not specified by this statute may report known or suspected abuse of a child to the department of children and families.

    Child abuse is defined to include physical injury, emotional injury, neglect or sexual abuse.

    To access the entire chapter of the relevant official Massachusetts Code online, follow:

    http://www.malegislature.gov/Laws/GeneralLaws/PartI/TitleXVII/Chapter119

    Links to the specific sections summarized above, including definitions, in an unofficial [1] version of the Code online, are available as follows:

    http://www.malegislature.gov/Laws/GeneralLaws/PartI/TitleXVII/Chapter119/Section51A

    http://www.malegislature.gov/Laws/GeneralLaws/PartI/TitleXVII/Chapter119/Section21

    To access more information on reporting of abuse, warning signs, and information for mandatory reporters, definitions and an overview of all relevant issues, see the Department of Health and Human Services website:

    http://www.mass.gov/eohhs/gov/departments/dcf/child-abuse-neglect/

    http://www.mass.gov/eohhs/gov/departments/dcf/child-abuse-neglect/warning-signs.html

    http://www.mass.gov/eohhs/gov/departments/dcf/child-abuse-neglect/reporting-abuse.html

    Child-at-Risk Hotline:
    1-800-792-5200

    Please note any unofficial sources may not reflect the most current changes in Massachusetts law and should not be relied upon.

  • Michigan

    Under Michigan law, certain professionals (including doctors and health care professionals, mental health professionals and counselors, social workers, teachers and school administrators, law enforcement officers, clergy and child care providers) who have reasonable cause to suspect child abuse or neglect are required to immediately make an oral report of the abuse (telephone or in person) to the Department Human Services. The report must be followed by a written report within seventy-two (72) hours.

    Child abuse is defined to include the non-accidental physical injury, mental injury, sexual abuse, exploitation or maltreatment.

    To access the specific sections summarized above in the official Michigan Code online, including any relevant definitions, follow:

    http://www.legislature.mi.gov/(S(cxbnpe45erw5npvpwfiosq45))/mileg.aspx?page=getObject&objectName=mcl-722-623

    http://www.legislature.mi.gov/(S(cxbnpe45erw5npvpwfiosq45))/mileg.aspx?page=getObject&objectName=mcl-722-622

    For links to useful information for mandatory reporters from the Michigan Department of Human Services website, follow:

    http://www.michigan.gov/dhs/0,1607,7-124-5452_7119_44443—,00.html

    http://www.michigan.gov/dhs/0,4562,7-124-5452_7119_44443-157836–,00.html

    For information on how to contact a local Department Human Services office, see the county map provided by Department Human Services at:

    http://www.michigan.gov/mdhhs/0,5885,7-339–96747–,00.html

    To report a suspected case of child abuse, call the Michigan Child Abuse Hotline at
    1-855-444-3911

  • Minnesota

    Under Minnesota law, certain persons (including health care professionals, social workers, child care providers, mental health professionals, teachers and school officials, law enforcement officers, clergy, and others) who know of or suspect physical or sexual abuse or neglect of a child are required to report such information to the local welfare agency, police department or to the county sheriff immediately (within twenty-four (24) hours). Any other person may voluntarily report known or suspected child abuse, neglect or sexual abuse to the local welfare agency, police department or the county sheriff.

    If a physician, advanced practice registered nurse, or a physician assistant determines that a child is in serious or critical condition as the result of sickness or injury caused by child abuse or neglect, it is defined as “near fatality”.

    The statute defines child abuse to include physical abuse, mental abuse, sexual abuse and neglect.

    To access the entire child abuse reporting chapter, including the information summarized above and any relevant definitions, follow:

    https://www.revisor.mn.gov/statutes/?id=626.556

    For more information on Minnesota’s reporting statute and tips to spot abuse, see Minnesota’s Department of Human Services website at:

    http://www.dhs.state.mn.us/main/idcplg?IdcService=GET_DYNAMIC_CONVERSION&RevisionSelectionMethod=LatestReleased&dDocName=id_000152

    To report child abuse in Minnesota, call the local social service office or the local police. Below is a link to the contact information for all social services offices by county:

    http://www.dhs.state.mn.us/main/idcplg?IdcService=GET_DYNAMIC_CONVERSION&RevisionSelectionMethod=LatestReleased&dDocName=id_016982

  • Mississippi

    Mississippi law requires certain professionals, including attorneys, physicians, nurses, psychologists, ministers, public or private school employees or any other persons having reasonable cause to suspect that a child is a neglected child or an abused child, to make an oral report of abuse immediately by telephone and thereafter by written report to the Department of Human Services. All reports to the Department of Human Services must contain the names and addresses of the child and the child’s parents or other persons responsible for the child’s care, if known, the child’s age, the nature and extent of the child’s injuries, including any evidence of previous injuries and any other information that might be helpful in establishing the cause of the injury and the identity of the perpetrator. Anyone who willfully violates this provision is liable for a fine or up to one year in jail.

    Mississippi has a mandatory reporting statute for sexual crimes against minors. The statute defines “mandatory reporter” as: “any of the following individuals performing their occupational duties: health care practitioner, clergy member, teaching or child care provider, law enforcement officer, or commercial image processor” and requires mandatory reporters to “make a report if it would be reasonable for the mandatory reporter to suspect that a sex crime against a minor has occurred.” Reports must be made to the law enforcement agency where the sex crime occurred. Failure to report is a misdemeanor offense. It also defines “sex crime” and each of the mandatory reporters in more detail.

    Under the Mississippi statute “abused child” means a child whose parent, guardian or custodian or any person responsible for his care or support, whether legally obligated to do so or not, has caused or allowed to be caused, upon the child, sexual abuse, sexual exploitation, emotional abuse, mental injury, non-accidental physical injury or other maltreatment. However, physical discipline, including spanking, performed on a child by a parent, guardian or custodian in a reasonable manner shall not be deemed abuse under this section. If a Child Protective Investigation does not result in an out-of-home placement, a Child Protective Investigator must provide information to the parent or guardians about community programs that provide respite care, voluntary guardianship or other support services for families in crisis.

    Links to the specific sections of the official Mississippi Code are not available. To access the entire Mississippi Code online, follow:

    http://www.lexisnexis.com/hottopics/mscode/

    For more information about reporting child abuse in Mississippi, how to spot abuse, and additional resources for mandatory reporters, see the Mississippi Department of Social Services Website, Children’s section and the following links.

    http://www.mdhs.state.ms.us/contact-mdhs/

    http://www.mdhs.state.ms.us/

    Child Abuse Hotline:
    1-800-222-8000
    or
    601-359-4991

  • Missouri

    Under Missouri law, certain individuals (including doctors and health care professionals, mental health care professionals, social workers, child care providers, probation or parole officers, teachers and school officials, clergy, law enforcement officers and others) are required to report known or suspected child abuse or neglect to the Division of Children within the Department of Social Services. Any other person besides those specifically named in the statute may report known or suspected abuse to the Missouri division of children. Reports are to be made by telephone or in person.

    Child abuse is defined to include physical, mental, sexual abuse and neglect of a child.

    To access the specific sections summarized above in the official Missouri Code online, including any relevant definitions, follow:

    http://www.moga.mo.gov/mostatutes/stathtml/21000001151.html

    To access the entire child abuse reporting chapter in the official Missouri Code online, follow:

    http://www.moga.mo.gov/mostatutes/ChaptersIndex/chaptIndex210.html

    For more information about reporting child abuse in Missouri, how to spot abuse, and additional resources for mandatory reporters, see the Missouri Department of Social Services Website, Children’s section and the following link:

    http://dss.mo.gov/cd/can.htm

    Children’s Division Child Abuse and Neglect Hotline:
    1-800-392-3738 or
    1-573-751-3448 (outside Missouri)
    TDD: 1-800-669-8689

  • Montana

    Under Montana law, certain listed professionals (including doctors and health care professionals, teachers and school officials, social workers, court appointed advocates, law enforcement officers, clergy and foster parents) are required to report any known or suspected child abuse they receive knowledge of in their professional or official capacities to the Department of Public Health and Human Services promptly. Any other person not specifically listed may make a report of known or suspected child abuse to the Department of Public Health and Human Services.

    Child abuse is defined as actual or substantial risk of physical or psychological harm to a child and includes abandonment, omissions and exposing child to criminal activity.

    To access the entire child abuse reporting chapter in the official Montana Code online, follow:

    http://leg.mt.gov/bills/mca_toc/41_3_2.htm

    To access the specific sections summarized above in the official Montana Code online, including any relevant definitions, follow:

    http://leg.mt.gov/bills/mca/41/3/41-3-201.htm

    For more information on the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services and child abuse, visit the department’s website at:

    http://www.dphhs.mt.gov/cfsd/index.shtml

    To report child abuse or neglect call toll-free:
    1-866-820-5437

  • Nebraska

    Under Nebraska law, certain individuals (including doctors and health care professionals, teachers and school employees, social workers and the inspector general) and any other person who knows of or suspects child abuse or neglect are required to immediately report the abuse or neglect to a law enforcement agency or to the Department of Health and Human Services on the child abuse hotline. Any oral report is required to be followed by a written report of the abuse or neglect.

    Child abuse or neglect is defined as knowingly, intentionally or negligently causing or permitting a minor child to be placed in a situation that endangers his/her life or physical or mental health; cruelly confined/punished; deprived of necessary food, clothing, shelter or care; left unattended in motor vehicle if such minor child is six years of age or younger; sexually abused; or sexually exploited.

    To access the entire child abuse reporting chapter in the official Nebraska Code online, sections 28-710 through 28-739 follow:

    http://nebraskalegislature.gov/laws/browse-statutes.php

    To access the specific sections summarized above in the official Nebraska Code online, including any relevant definitions, follow:

    http://nebraskalegislature.gov/laws/statutes.php?statute=28-710

    http://nebraskalegislature.gov/laws/statutes.php?statute=28-711

    For more information on reporting child abuse and spotting abuse and neglect in Nebraska, visit the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services website at:

    http://dhhs.ne.gov/Pages/default.aspx

    http://dhhs.ne.gov/children_family_services/Pages/nea_cha_abuse.aspx

    Child Abuse & Neglect Hotline:
    1-800-652-1999

  • Nevada

    Under Nevada law, certain professionals (including doctors and health care professionals, mental health care professionals, social workers, clergy, child care providers and any adult employed by an entity that provides organized activities for children) who discover or suspect child abuse or neglect in their professional capacities, are required to report the abuse/neglect to a child welfare agency or a law enforcement agency within twenty-four hours. Any other person not specifically named may make a report of any known or suspected child abuse/neglect. A report is to be made by telephone or other means and is to be followed be a written report as soon as possible.

    Abuse or neglect of a child means physical or mental injury of a non-accidental nature; sexual abuse or exploitation; or negligent treatment whereby a child’s health or welfare is harmed or threatened with harm.

    To access the entire child abuse reporting chapter in the official Nevada Code online, sections 220 through 432B follow:

    http://www.leg.state.nv.us/NRS/NRS-432B.html

    To access the specific sections summarized above in the official Nevada Code online, including any relevant definitions, follow:

    https://www.leg.state.nv.us/NRS/NRS-432B.html#NRS432BSec220

    https://www.leg.state.nv.us/NRS/NRS-432B.html#NRS432BSec230

    For more information on reporting child abuse and the Nevada Department of Health and Human Services Division of Children and Families, follow:

    http://dcfs.nv.gov/

    To report child abuse or neglect call:
    1-800- 992-5757

  • New Hampshire

    Under New Hampshire law, certain professionals (including doctors and health care professionals, teachers and school officials, child care providers, mental health care professionals, law enforcement officers and clergy) and any other person who knows of or suspects child abuse or neglect are required to report by telephone or in person to the Department of Health and Human Services and to follow the oral report with a written report within forty-eight (48) hours.

    The statute defines child abuse to include physical, mental and sexual abuse.

    To access the entire child abuse chapter of the official New Hampshire Code online, follow:

    http://www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rsa/html/NHTOC/NHTOC-XII-169-C.htm

    To access the specific sections summarized above in the official New Hampshire Code online, including any relevant definitions, follow:

    http://www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rsa/html/XII/169-C/169-C-29.htm

    http://www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rsa/html/XII/169-C/169-C-30.htm

    http://www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rsa/html/XII/169-C/169-C-3.htm

    For more information on reporting abuse and neglect in New Hampshire, visit the Department of Health and Human Services website at:

    http://www.dhhs.nh.gov/dcyf/cps/stop.htm

    http://www.dhhs.nh.gov/dcyf/cps/signs.htm

    To find contact information for the Department of Health and Human Services to report abuse, follow:

    http://www.dhhs.nh.gov/dcyf/cps/contact.htm

    To report child abuse toll-free, call:
    1-800-894-5533 (in state only)

  • New Jersey

    Under New Jersey law, any person that knows of or suspects child abuse is required to immediately report such abuse to the New Jersey Division of Youth and Family Services by telephone or otherwise. The statute defines abuse to include physical, mental and sexual abuse.

    To access the entire child abuse chapter of the official New Jersey Code online, follow:

    http://law.justia.com/codes/new-jersey/2013/title-9/section-9-6-8.9/

    http://law.justia.com/codes/new-jersey/2013/title-9/section-9-6-8.10/

    For more information on reporting child abuse in New Jersey and tips on spotting abuse, visit the Department of Children and Families website at:

    http://www.state.nj.us/dcf/reporting/how/index.html

    To report child abuse, call the New Jersey Child Abuse Hotline at:
    1-877-NJ-ABUSE (1-877-652-2873)

  • New Mexico

    Under New Mexico law, every person, including certain listed professionals, who knows of, or reasonably suspects, child abuse or neglect is required to immediately make a report of that abuse to a local law enforcement agency, the Department of Children, Youth and Families or to a tribal law enforcement or social services agency.

    Child abuse is defined to include physical, mental, sexual abuse or neglect. Council is defined as the Substitute Care Advisory Council established and Relative is defined as a person related to another person by blood within the fifth degree of consanguinity or through marriage by the fifth degree of affinity.

    Links to the specific sections of the official New Mexico Code online are not available. The mandatory child abuse reporting act is located in Chapter 32A (Children’s Code), Subtitle 4 (Child Abuse and Neglect), Sections 32A-4-1 through 32A-4-34. The link to the entire official New Mexico Code online is:

    http://public.nmcompcomm.us/nmpublic/gateway.dll/?f=templates&fn=default.htm

    Links to the specific sections summarized above, including definitions, in an unofficial [1] version of the New Mexico Code online, are available as follows:

    http://law.justia.com/codes/new-mexico/2013/chapter-32a/article-4/section-32a-4-2/

    http://law.justia.com/codes/new-mexico/2013/chapter-32a/article-4/section-32a-4-3/

    For more information about reporting child abuse and tips on spotting abuse, visit:

    http://cyfd.org/child-abuse-neglect

    To report abuse or neglect, call:
    1-855-333-SAFE
    Cell phones: #SAFE (#7233)

    Please note any unofficial sources may not reflect the most current changes in New Mexico law and should not be relied upon.

  • New York

    Under New York law, certain professionals (including doctors and health care professionals, social workers, mental health professionals, teachers and school officials, summer or day camp employees, child care providers, foster care parents or workers, substance abuse counselors, law enforcement officers, district attorneys, full or part-time compensated school employee required to hold a temporary coaching license or professional coaching certificate that know of or suspect child abuse in their professional capacities are required to report such abuse by telephone, fax, or in writing. Any oral reports are to be followed by a written report within forty-eight hours. Oral reports are to be made to the statewide central register of child abuse and maltreatment or to the local child protective services agency. Written reports are to be made, in most cases, to the local child protective services agency. Any other person not specifically listed may make a report of any known or suspected abuse.

    To access the specific sections summarized above in the official New York Code online, including any relevant definitions, follow:

    https://www.nycourts.gov/lawlibraries/nycodesstatutes.shtml

    The New York Office of Children and Family Services website provides an overview of the New York reporting law, frequently asked questions and warning signs of abuse, definitions, links and information for mandatory reporters at the links below:

    http://ocfs.ny.gov/main/cps/

    http://ocfs.ny.gov/main/documents/docs.asp?document_type=1&category_number=5

    http://ocfs.ny.gov/main/cps/critical.asp

    http://ocfs.ny.gov/main/cps/signs.asp

    http://ocfs.ny.gov/ohrd/ccg/

    http://ocfs.ny.gov/main/prevention/faqs.asp

    Call statewide toll free at:
    1-800-342-3720
    TDD/TTY: 1-800-638-5163

    If you believe that a child is in immediate danger, call 911 or your local police department.

  • North Carolina

    Under North Carolina law, any person who knows of or has reason to suspect child abuse is required to report that abuse to the Director of the Department of Social Services in the county where the child lives or can be found. The report can be made orally, by telephone, in person or in writing.

    Abuse is defined to include physical, mental and sexual abuse.

    To access the specific sections summarized above in the official North Carolina Code online, including any relevant definitions, follow:

    http://www.ncleg.net/EnactedLegislation/Statutes/HTML/BySection/Chapter_7B/GS_7B-301.html

    http://www.ncleg.net/EnactedLegislation/Statutes/HTML/BySection/Chapter_7B/GS_7B-101.html

    The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services website provides an overview of the North Carolina reporting law at the link below:

    http://www2.ncdhhs.gov/dss/cps/about.htm

    To report abuse, call your local social services office. To find contact information for your local office by county, follow:

    http://www.ncdhhs.gov/divisions/dss/local-county-social-services-offices

  • North Dakota

    Under North Dakota law, certain professionals (including doctors and health care professionals, mental health professionals, teachers and school officials, social workers, child care providers, foster parents, law enforcement officers, or clergy, among others) are required to report any known or suspected child abuse to the Department of Human Services (orally or in writing) if that information becomes known in their professional or official capacity. Any other person not specifically listed may report known or suspected abuse or neglect. Any oral report must be followed by a written report within forty-eight (48) hours.

    Abuse is defined to include physical, mental and sexual abuse.

    Links to the specific sections of the official North Dakota Code online are not available. At this time, no links to these specific sections are available online from unofficial sources. The mandatory child abuse reporting act is located in Title 50 (Public Welfare), Chapter 50-25.1 (Child Abuse and Neglect), Sections 5-25.1-01 through 5-25.1-19. The link to Title 50 of the official North Dakota Code online is:

    http://www.legis.nd.gov/cencode/t50.html

    The North Dakota Department of Human Services website contains additional information on reporting and spotting child abuse:

    http://www.nd.gov/dhs/services/childfamily/cps/#reporting

    http://www.nd.gov/dhs/services/childfamily/cps/#mandating

    http://www.nd.gov/eforms/Doc/sfn00960.pdf

    To find contact information for all local offices of the North Dakota Department of Human Services in order to report child abuse, follow:

    https://www.nd.gov/dhs/services/adultsaging/reporting.html

    To report child abuse in North Dakota, call:
    1-800-422-4453

  • Ohio

    Under Ohio law, certain professionals (including doctors and health care professionals, mental health care professionals, child care provider, day camp providers, school teachers or school officials and superintendent or regional administrator employed by the department of youth services ) acting in their professional capacities who know of or suspect child abuse are required to immediately report that knowledge or suspicion to a Public Children Services Agency or a local law enforcement agency. If two or more health care professionals providing health care services to a child, determine or suspect that the child has been or is being abused or neglected, the health care professionals are to report the abuse or neglect. Any other person not specifically listed may report any known or suspected abuse. The results of any available reports of examinations, tests, or procedures shall be included in a report and shall be provided to the Public Children Services Agency.

    Abuse is defined to include physical and mental abuse.

    To access the entire child abuse act of the official Ohio Code online, follow:

    http://codes.ohio.gov/orc/2151.421

    For more information of reporting child abuse in Ohio, visit the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services website:

    https://jfs.ohio.gov/ocf/childprotectiveservices.stm

    To report child abuse in Ohio, contact the county Public Children’s Service Agency. Contact information for each agency by county is provided here:

    http://www.pcsao.org/membership/agency-directory

    1- 855-O-H-Child (1-855-642-4453)

  • Oklahoma

    Under Oklahoma law, every person having knowledge of or suspicion of child abuse is required to report the information to the Department of Human Services via the child abuse hotline. No employer, supervisor, administrator, governing body or entity shall interfere with the reporting obligations. Any employer, supervisor, administrator, governing body or entity who discharges, discriminates or retaliates against the employee or other person shall be liable for damages, cost and attorney fees. If a child who is the subject of a report or if another child is harmed by the discharge, discrimination or retaliation, the party harmed may file an action to recover damages, costs and attorney fees.

    Abuse is defined to include physical abuse, mental abuse, sexual abuse and exploitation.

    To access PDFs of the child abuse act sections of the official Oklahoma Code online, follow:

    http://www.oklegislature.gov/osstatuestitle.html

    To access the specific sections summarized above in the official Oklahoma Code online, including any relevant definitions, follow:

    http://www.oscn.net/applications/oscn/DeliverDocument.asp?CiteID=455989

    For more information, visit the Oklahoma Department of Humans Services website at:

    http://www.okdhs.org/Pages/default.aspx

    OKDHS Abuse and Neglect Hotline:
    1-800-522-3511 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

  • Oregon

    Under Oregon law, certain officials and professionals including doctors and health care professionals, school employees, law enforcement officers, clergy, social workers, mental health professionals, firefighters, court appointed advocates, child care providers, employees or public or private organizations providing child related activities like scout camps, day camps, summer camps and religious centers, as well as coaches, assistants and trainers of amateur,

    semiprofessional or professional athlete (if compensated and if the athlete is a child), personal support worker and home care worker with knowledge of or suspicion of child abuse are required to immediately make an oral report of such abuse to the Department of Human Services by telephone or in person.

    Abuse is defined to include physical abuse, mental abuse, sexual abuse, exploitation and neglect.

    To access the entire child abuse chapter in the official Oregon Code online, follow:

    https://www.oregonlegislature.gov/bills_laws/Pages/ORS.aspx

    For valuable information on reporting abuse in Oregon and tools to determine what constitutes abuse, visit the Department of Human Services website at:

    http://www.oregon.gov/dhs/children/child-abuse/Pages/Data-Publications.aspx

    http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/CHILDREN/CHILD-ABUSE/Pages/index.aspx

    To report child abuse or neglect, follow the link to contact information for your local office:

    http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/CHILDREN/CHILD-ABUSE/Pages/Reporting-Numbers.aspx

    Or Call: 1- 855 503 SAFE (7233)

  • Pennsylvania

    Under Pennsylvania law, certain professionals (including doctors and health care professionals, clergy, school employees and officials, social workers, child care providers, law enforcement officials, an attorney, emergency medical services provider certified by the Department of Health, an employee of a public library, an independent contractor, a foster parent and any such person who has direct or regular contact with a child through any program, activity or service sponsored by a school, for-profit organization or religious or other not-for-profit organization) who discover child abuse or suspect child abuse in the course of their professional responsibilities are required to report immediately such abuse by telephone to the Department of Public Welfare or to the county children and youth social service agency, and must be followed by a written report within forty-eight (48) hours. Any other person not specifically listed by statute may report known or suspected child abuse.

    Abuse is defined to include physical, mental or sexual abuse.

    To access the specific sections summarized above in the official Pennsylvania Code online, including any relevant definitions, follow:

    http://www.legis.state.pa.us/WU01/LI/LI/CT/HTM/23/00.063.011.000..HTM

    http://www.legis.state.pa.us/WU01/LI/LI/CT/HTM/23/00.063.003.000..HTM

    http://www.legis.state.pa.us/WU01/LI/LI/CT/HTM/23/00.063.012.000..HTM

    http://www.legis.state.pa.us/WU01/LI/LI/CT/HTM/23/00.063.013.000..HTM

    For more information of reporting child abuse in Pennsylvania, follow:

    http://www.pa-fsa.org/Home/gclid/CPTZxsqfncoCFYEYHwodArgAjg

    Contact information for each local children and youth agency can be found at:

    http://www.pcya.org/Pages/ContactYourAgency.aspx

    To report child abuse in Pennsylvania, call the Child Line Hotline at:
    1-800-932-0313
    TDD: 1-866-872-1677

  • Rhode Island

    Under Rhode Island law, any person who knows of or suspects child abuse or sexual abuse of a child is required to report such abuse within twenty-four (24) hours to the Department of Children, Youth and Families. The Department shall post in all Public and Private Schools a Child Abuse Hotline telephone number.

    Abuse is defined to include physical abuse, mental abuse, sexual abuse and neglect.

    To access the entire child abuse chapter in the official Rhode Island Code online, follow:

    http://www.rilin.state.ri.us/Statutes/TITLE40/40-11/INDEX.HTM

    To access the specific sections summarized above in the official Rhode Island Code online, including any relevant definitions, follow:

    http://www.rilin.state.ri.us/Statutes/TITLE40/40-11/40-11-3.HTM

    http://www.rilin.state.ri.us/Statutes/TITLE40/40-11/40-11-2.HTM

    For more information about reporting child abuse in Rhode Island, follow:

    http://www.dcyf.ri.gov/child_welfare/reporting.php

    Child Abuse Hotline:
    1-800- RI-CHILD
    1-800-742-4453

  • South Carolina

    Under South Carolina law, certain professionals (including doctors and health care professionals, mental health professionals, clergy, school teachers or administrators, child care providers, foster families and law enforcement officers) are required to report any known or suspected child abuse they encounter in their professional capacities orally to the county Department of Social Services or to a law enforcement agency. Any other person may report known or suspected child abuse.

    Abuse is defined to include physical abuse, mental abuse, sexual abuse and neglect.

    To access the entire child abuse chapter in the official South Carolina Code online, follow:

    http://www.scstatehouse.gov/code/t63c007.php

    Links to specific sections are not available to the official South Carolina Code. Links to specific sections from unofficial sources do not appear available at this time.

    For more information on the South Carolina law and reporting in South Carolina, follow:

    https://dss.sc.gov/abuseneglect/report-abuse-and-neglect

    For contact information of all county social services offices by county, follow:

    https://dss.sc.gov/contact/

  • South Dakota

    Under South Dakota law, certain professionals (including doctors and health care professionals, mental health care professionals, social workers, parole officers, law enforcement officers, teachers and school officials, employees of a child advocacy organization or child welfare organization, emergency medical technicians and paramedics) who know of or suspect child abuse are required to report that information by telephone or orally otherwise to the state attorney for the county where the child resides, to the Department of Social Services or to local law enforcement.

    Abuse is defined to include physical abuse, mental abuse, sexual abuse and neglect.

    To access the entire child abuse chapter in the official South Dakota Code online, follow:

    http://legis.sd.gov/Statutes/Codified_Laws/DisplayStatute.aspx?Type=Statute&Statute=2 6-8A

    Links to the specific sections summarized above, including definitions, of the official South Dakota Code online are available as follows:

    http://legis.sd.gov/Statutes/Codified_Laws/DisplayStatute.aspx?Type=Statute&Statute=26-8A-3

    http://legis.sd.gov/Statutes/Codified_Laws/DisplayStatute.aspx?Type=Statute&Statute=2 6-8A-2

    http://legis.sd.gov/Statutes/Codified_Laws/DisplayStatute.aspx?Type=Statute&Statute=2 6-8A-8

    For contact information for the local departments of social services, follow:

    https://dss.sd.gov/behavioralhealth/

  • Tennessee

    Under Tennessee law, any person who has knowledge of or suspects child abuse is required to report that information to a judge having juvenile jurisdiction of the child, the Department of Children’s Services, the sheriff of the county where the child resides or the chief law enforcement officer where the child resides immediately, by telephone or otherwise.

    The statutes define abuse to include physical or mental injury and sexual abuse.

    Links to the specific sections of the official Tennessee Code are not available. The mandatory reporting statute is found in Title 37 (Juveniles), Chapter 1 (Juvenile Courts and Proceedings), Part 4- Mandatory Child Abuse Reports and Part 6- Child Sexual Abuse, Section 37-1-401 through 37-1-414 and 37-1-605. To access the entire Tennessee Code, follow:

    http://www.lexisnexis.com/hottopics/tncode/

    Links to the specific sections summarized above, including definitions, in an unofficial [1] version of the Code online are available as follows:

    http://law.justia.com/codes/tennessee/2010/title-37/chapter-1/part-4/

    http://law.justia.com/codes/tennessee/2010/title-37/chapter-1/part-4/37-1-401/

    http://law.justia.com/codes/tennessee/2010/title-37/chapter-1/part-6/37-1-605/

    Use the following link to find more information on Tennessee’s reporting guidelines and statutes:

    https://www.sworps.tennessee.edu/child_abuse_reporting/start.html

    To report abuse or neglect call:
    1-877-542-2873
    or
    1-877-237-0004

    Please note any unofficial sources may not reflect the most current changes in Tennessee law and should not be relied upon.

  • Texas

    Under Texas law, any person having cause to believe that a child is being abused or neglected is required to report the abuse to any local law enforcement agency, the Department of Family and Protective Services, the regulatory agency for the facility where the abuse occurred, or the court designated agency responsible for the protection of children, unless the abuse is by the parent/caretaker in which case the abuse should be reported to the Department of Family and Protective Services. Certain professionals are required to report abuse within forty-eight (48) hours. Those having information of child abuse occurring on a person who is now an adult has a duty to report said abuse if it will protect another person from suffering similar abuse.

    Abuse is defined to include physical injury, mental injury, sexual injury, exposure to controlled substances, exploitation or trafficking of the child.

    Links to the specific sections summarized above, including definitions, of the official Texas Code online are available as follows:

    http://www.statutes.legis.state.tx.us/Docs/FA/htm/FA.261.htm#261.101

    http://www.statutes.legis.state.tx.us/Docs/FA/htm/FA.261.htm#261.001

    http://www.statutes.legis.state.tx.us/Docs/FA/htm/FA.261.htm

    The Texas Department of Family and Protective Services website offers more information on reporting child abuse in Texas as well as frequently asked questions about reporting child abuse in Texas at the links below:

    http://www.dfps.state.tx.us/Contact_Us/report_abuse.asp

    http://www.dfps.state.tx.us/Contact_Us/report_abuse_faqs.asp

    There are two ways to report abuse to the Department:

    Call the Abuse Hotline at:
    1-800-252-5400
    Or by going online at the Texas Abuse Hotline site at: https://www.txabusehotline.org/Login/Default.aspx

  • Utah

    Under Utah law, any person, including licensed doctors, nurses and other licensed persons of the medical practice arts, who knows of or suspects child abuse or neglect is required to immediately report that information to a law enforcement officer, a law enforcement agency, or an office of the division of child and family services.

    Child abuse is defined as non-accidental harm of a child, threatened harm of a child, sexual exploitation or sexual abuse.

    To access the entire child abuse reporting chapter of the official Utah Code online, follow:

    www.utah.gov/government/utahlaws.html

    Links to the specific sections summarized above, including definitions, of the official Utah Code online are available as follows:

    http://le.utah.gov/xcode/Title62A/Chapter4A/62A-4a-S403.html?v=C62A-4a-S403_1800010118000101

    http://le.utah.gov/xcode/Title62A/Chapter4A/62A-4a-S402.html?v=C62A-4a- S402_1800010118000101

    For more information on the Utah law and reporting in Utah, visit the division of child services website at the link below:

    http://dcfs.utah.gov/

    Child Abuse/Neglect Hotline:
    1-855-323-3237

  • Vermont

    Under Vermont law, certain professionals (including doctors and health care professionals, mental health care professionals, child care providers, school teachers and administrators, headmasters of private schools, student teachers, social workers, probation officers, law enforcement officers, clergy and camp counselors) who know of or have reason to suspect child abuse is occurring, are required to report the abuse to the commissioner for children and families or his designee within twenty-four hours. Any other concerned person not specifically listed may make a report to the Commissioner for Children and Families or his designee orally or in writing.

    The definition of “abused or neglected child” means a child whose physical health, psychological growth and development or welfare is harmed or is a child who is at substantial risk of harm by the acts or omissions of his or her parent or other person responsible for the child’s welfare. An “abused or neglected child” also means a child who is sexually abused or at substantial risk of sexual abuse by any person.

    To access the entire child abuse reporting chapter of the official Vermont Code online, follow:

    http://legislature.vermont.gov/statutes/chapter/33/049

    For more information about reporting child abuse in Vermont, the Vermont mandatory reporting law, and other useful information and tools on spotting abuse, visit the Department of Children and Families website at the links below:

    http://dcf.vermont.gov/

    Child Abuse Hotline:
    1-800-649-5285

  • Virginia

    Under Virginia law, certain professionals (including licensed medical professionals and other health care professionals, social workers, probation officers, teachers or school administrators, child care providers, mental health professionals, family-services specialist, law enforcement officers, mediators, court appointed advocates, athletic coaches, athletic directors or others over the age of 18 including employees or volunteers with private sports organizations, administrators and persons over the age of 18 employed by public or private day camps and youth centers or youth recreation programs) , are required to report known or suspected child abuse immediately to the local department of social services in the city or county where the child resides or where the abuse is believed to be occurring by calling the child abuse hotline. Any other person not specifically listed in the statute may make a report of known or suspected child abuse to the local Department of Social Services.

    Abuse is defined to include physical or mental injury, neglect and sexual abuse.

    To access the entire child abuse reporting chapter of the official Virginia Code online, follow:

    http://law.lis.virginia.gov/vacode/

    To access the specific sections summarized above in the official Virginia Code online, follow:

    http://law.lis.virginia.gov/vacode/title63.2/chapter15/section63.2-1509/

    http://law.lis.virginia.gov/vacode/title63.2/chapter15/section63.2-1510/

    http://law.lis.virginia.gov/vacode/title63.2/chapter15/section63.2-100/

    http://law.lis.virginia.gov/vacode/title63.2/chapter15/section63.2-1503/

    For more information, visit the Virginia department of social services website at:

    http://www.dss.virginia.gov/about/abuse.html

    http://www.dss.virginia.gov/family/cps/index2.cgi

    For a list of local departments follow:

    http://www.dss.virginia.gov/localagency/

    Report child abuse/neglect to Child Protective Services (CPS)
    In Virginia: 1-800-552-7096
    Out-of-state: 1-804-786-8536

  • Washington

    Under Washington law, certain professionals (including doctors and health care professionals, social workers, law enforcement officers, child care providers, probation officers, or in non-profit organizations and administrators and academic or athletic department employees of public or private institutions of higher education) who have reason to know or suspect child abuse is occurring is required to report the abuse to a law enforcement agency, including military law enforcement, if appropriate or to the Department of Social and Health Services. Any other person not specifically listed may make a report of known or suspected child abuse to law enforcement of the Washington Department of Social Services. Any administrator of a public or private institution of higher education not already a mandatory reporter must report information received by staff and through internal procedures.

    Abuse means sexual abuse, sexual exploitation or injury of a child by any person under circumstances which cause harm to the child’s health, welfare, or safety; or the negligent treatment or maltreatment of a child by a person responsible for or providing care to the child.

    To access the entire child abuse reporting chapter of the official Washington Code online, follow:

    http://apps.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=26.44

    To access the specific sections summarized above in the official Washington Code online, follow:

    http://apps.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=26.44.020

    http://apps.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=26.44.030

    For more information visit the Washington Department of Social Services website at the links below:

    http://www.dshs.wa.gov/endharm.shtml

    http://www.dshs.wa.gov/ca/safety/abuseReport.asp?2

    To report child abuse, call:
    1-866-END-HARM
    (1-866-363-4276)