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 > Little League Online > Tournament Resources > Baseball and Softball Tournament Delay Policy

Baseball and Softball Tournament Delay Policy

In a few instances during tournament play, managers have instructed players to intentionally pitch wildly for the purpose of allowing the opposing team to score runs. In these cases, the intent was:
to prolong the game for the purpose of extending it beyond the current half-inning, in order to fulfill the minimum requirements of mandatory play, or,
to lose the game intentionally for the purpose of influencing the tiebreaker system under the Pool Play Format.
In other cases, managers have instructed hitters and runners to intentionally take action that would result in being called out (to shorten the game for any purpose).

When it becomes apparent to the umpire that the level of play in the game has deteriorated (by the actions of either team), the game should be stopped. If, in the umpire’s judgment, either team is engaged in the actions above, the umpire should refer the issue to the Tournament Director, who should then contact the appropriate Regional Center for a decision by the Tournament Committee in Williamsport.

The Tournament Committee will not tolerate this type of behavior, as it undermines the values of sportsmanship and fair play that should be foremost on the minds of all adults involved. When such behavior is brought to the attention of the Tournament Committee, the Tournament Committee may impose penalties up to and including suspension or revocation of tournament privileges for the league, team, manager, coaches and/or players involved, and/or forfeiture of the game.

Note: This policy is not to be interpreted as a prohibition against intentional walks when used as a tactic on the part of the defense to set up a force-out, double-play, to avoid pitching to a strong hitter, etc. Such intentional walks should be considered a natural part of the game.