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 > Little League Online > Learn More > Programs > Child Protection Program > Concussions in Youth Athletes > Concussions in Youth Athletes - Vermont

Concussions in Youth Athletes - Vermont

Vermont

Governor Shumlin signed SB 100 into law on May 31, 2011. This law can be found at 16 V.S.A. section 1431, under the title dealing with Education and the chapter dealing with health. (Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 16, § 1431). The law was amended with enactment of HB 604, which was introduced on January 26, 2012. On January 11, 2013, S. 4 was introduced and on June 4, 2013, it was signed into law by the governor (Act No. 0068). The new law became effective on July 1, 2013 with the exception of 16 V.S.A. § 143(f) relating to the presence of a health care provider at school sport events, which is effective July 15, 2015.

The text of 16 V.S.A. §1431 can be viewed online at:

http://www.leg.state.vt.us/statutes/fullsection.cfm?Title=16&Chapter=031&Section=01431

This law requires the Secretary of Education to develop statewide guidelines, forms and information on concussions. The principal of each school must ensure: that the information is provided annually to student athletes; each parent/guardian and student annually sign a form acknowledging receipt of the information; and each coach receive concussion training at least every two years. Every referee of a high school team contest involving a collision sport shall receive training every two (2) years. If a student is suspected of sustaining a concussion, the student may not participate until examined by a health care professional and cleared in writing. A coach or a health care provider are precluded from allowing a youth athlete to participate in further play, if the coach had reason to believe that the athlete has sustained a concussion or head injury during practice or in the course of a competition. A coach and health care provider are also precluded from returning an athlete to play who was removed from play as a result of a concussion or head injury until the athlete is evaluated and written clearance is received from a health care provider. A home team is encouraged to have a health care provider present at any event in which a high school team is involved in a contact sport. A school is required to notify a parent when a student sustains a concussion within 24 hours. The Vermont Traumatic Brain Injury Advisory Board to the extent permitted shall obtain information necessary to create an annual report detailing the number of concussions sustained by student athletes in Vermont, the sport involved, the number of student athletes treated in emergency rooms and who made the decision regarding a return to play.

On March 12, 2013, H. 502 was introduced and on March 26, the bill was referred to the Health Care Committee. As proposed, H. 502 would extend the existing law related to school athletics and youth athletes to any organized youth activities. The proposed legislation would define youth athletic team as sports teams for persons under the age of eighteen (18) that is organized in accordance with a nonprofit or similar charter or which is a member team organized by or affiliated with a county or municipal recreation department. There has been no further action taken on H. 502 since March 26, 2013.

The text of H. 502 can be viewed online at:

http://www.leg.state.vt.us/database/status/summary.cfm?Bill=H%2E0502&Session=2014