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 > Little League Online > Learn More > Newsletters > Coach's Box Newsletter > 2006 > Coach's Box - October 2006 > Behind the Plate - October 2006

Behind the Plate - October 2006

 

Volume 1, No. 7

 

October 2006

 
     
      
  
Behind the Plate with Andy
By Andy Konyar
Umpire Consultant
Little League International

Rule 7.09 mentions that it is base coach interference when the base coach at 1st or 3rd base assists the runner at that base in either returning or leaving. You understand the rule and its penalties but have never seen it happen. Maybe you have and did not recognize it; here are a few things you should be looking for when you watch the base coaches. Having trouble with batting out of turn and who is out and when. Not quite sure when and who should call a batting out of turn. Here are some tips to help you understand the how, why and when of rule 6.07.

#1. Rule 7.09 –
It is interference by a batter or runner when, in the judgment of the umpire, the base coach at third base or first base, by touching or holding the runner, physically assists that runner in returning to or leaving third base or first base;

Question: How can a base coach at third base or first base physically assist the runner at that base?

Answer: A base coach at first or third base could grab a runner to stop them from running passed the base; a base coach at first or third base could place his/her hand on the back of a base runner and give a push when a fly ball is caught to get the runner started in a tag up and advance attempt; a base coach at first or third base could step in front of a runner to get them to stop. These are just a few of the ways coaches could physically assist runners.

Penalty: The runner that is assisted is called out immediately and the ball is dead if there is a play being made on that runner. Otherwise, the runner that is assisted is called out and the ball is dead after all other action is completed (delayed dead ball). However, “high-fiving” a runner during a home run trot, for example, would not be interference.

#2. Rule is 6.07 Batting out of turn can be a little tricky, particularly when more than one batter bats out of turn.

In this scenario, numbers are used instead of Abel, Baker, etc.

Numbers 5, 6, 7 and 8 in the batting order are due to bat in the second inning. Number 7 leads off and doubles, followed by number 6 who sacrifices him to third. What happens if Number 5 then comes to bat and …

…the mistake is discovered by the defense before a pitch is delivered to 5? Since a pitch was made to 6, the double by 7 is legal and 8 should have been the proper batter instead of 5. Batter 8 is then called out, and 9 is the proper batter. Also, the runner who was sacrificed to third must return to second because the advance was as a result of a batted ball hit by an improper batter.

… 5 takes a strike before the mistake is discovered by the defense? Same ruling, except that 8 becomes the proper batter with a count of one strike. Again, no penalty is charged.

… 5 takes a ball that goes to the backstop, bringing 7 in to score, before the mistake is discovered by the defense? The run counts, and 8 becomes the proper batter with a count of one ball. Once again, no penalty is charged.

… 5 flies out, sacrificing 7 in from third, and then the mistake is discovered by the defense? The fly-out counts, but the sacrifice and run do not, and 7 is returned to third base. In this case, the actions of 6 and 7 were legalized, 8 is charged with the at-bat, and 9 becomes the proper batter.

… 5 draws a walk, and then the mistake is discovered by the defense? The walk is nullified, 5 is removed from first base, and 8 (the proper batter in this case) is called out and charged with the at-bat. In this case, the actions of 6 and 7 were legalized, and 9 becomes the proper batter.

Remember, in cases of batting out of order, neither the umpire nor the scorekeeper should bring it to the attention of either team. It is up to the defense to catch the mistake. The pertinent rule is 6.07.

This is different from an ineligible pitcher or player. Anyone (including the opposing manager) who notices that an ineligible pitcher or player is about to enter the game should stop it before it happens.

Note: You may now join the Umpire Registry by clicking on this link:
http://www.Eteamz.com/llbumpireregistry


 
 
 
 
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